Ilford – Essex Since 1650 and The Great Eastern Railway

Clear back in the 1600’s Ilford – Essex was a small town of approximately 60 houses, when the Great Eastern Railway came through in the early 1800’s the population started climbing.

One of the biggest towns in England by 1880, the population was over 10,000 strong, and by the early 1930’s, 167,000 people inhabited the area. This was all due to the Railway advancement.

The economy in the area is served by major firms including Kelvin Hughes, Plessey Radio and Television Company and Howards Ltd. It’s most well known business the Ilford Photographic company ( Ilford Imaging) was started in 1879 when A. H. Harman began the business in his basement and quickly grew into a major employer.

The area is active in many activities including art exhibitions, Charity Shows at the Kenneth More Theatre and many different types of exhibits and shows make this theatre an active one.

You’ll also find a variety of evening entertainment with several different night clubs including the Bollywood Club, Berties, Faces Nightclub, and Shout. Find reviews online concerning these clubs and then enjoy a night on the town.

Shopping is another pastime in the area with The Exchange, which has over 100 shops, Ilford High Road shopping, and Barkingside High Street as well.

Transportation in the area is offered through the Train/Tube/Coach services with major stations at Barkingside and Gants Hill.

The Rebdridge Green Fair in May is an activity everyone enjoys and offers live music, shopping at a variety of booths and educational booths.

You’ll also find a wide assortment of clubs and civic activities such as the 2nd Ilford North Beaver-Scout Colony, Strides Badminton Club, Friends of the Earth Ilford, Rascals Theatre School, Chinese Kickboxing, Cobra Self Defence, Barkingside Sports and Leisure Group, Signalise and the Ilford Choral Society among others.

Starting Your Own Home Education Support Group

If you are starting a support group, you can decide what type of group you want right from the beginning.

If you have toddlers or small children you could meet in your own home (in the beginning) for mainly parents to chat and children to play.

With older children/teens organised activities related to home education such as crafts, field trips, science experiments and projects are a good idea.

Do investigate venues. Prices for church halls vary enormously as do the facilities available. Will your children want to do lots of claywork and painting? Then make sure your hall has easy to clean floors.

If you expect to have more arts and crafts (pens, crayons, etc) and events with guest speakers then a carpeted hall may be fine.

Once you have decided which hall you want to hire, you will need to contact the person who has responsibility for hiring it out.

Once you have organised your first date, start telling people about it. Maybe put up a leaflet at your local library or newsagent. Maybe put an advert in your local paper (although you will need to consider the financial aspects of this).

At your first monthly meeting remember to ask for donations from each family to cover the cost of the hall and refreshments. An average price for this depending on price of the hall and/or families attending is £2.50 to £3.50. Take a note of names, addresses and contact telephone numbers or email addresses. (You can then contact people a couple of days before the next meeting to remind them).

Get chatting to the people attending, ask them what they would like to do at the meetings, would they be interested in bringing an activity next time? Do they know anyone who would be interested in coming to give a talk or workshop? In this way you can gradually build a list of people who are willing to help out. Actively encourage members to bring activities each time for all the children to enjoy.

Some people like to “theme” a meeting say, astronomy or sealife to begin with. It makes it easier for other members of the group to think of activities to bring.

Try to book at least 3 meetings in advance – you can then give out a letter at your meeting with the next dates on.

If you want to advertise your new home education support meeting on this website for free please contact me at:

info@seeheg.org

Good Luck and Enjoy!

The Town of Brentwood, Essex

The town of Brentwood, Essex, England lies within the commuter zone of the city of London, about 20 miles to the northeast of the Charing Cross junction lying within the city. Lying near to the M25 motorway, which is a 117 mile long beltway encircling London, Brentwood is also the principal settlement of the Borough of Brentwood.

Known largely as a commuter and suburban town, Brentwood enjoys a small but growing shopping district along its main street. It has a current population of around 45, 000 people within its boundaries, and there is a quite nice expanse of open country and no small amount of woodland that butts up closely in spots, reaching even to the center of town.

Brentwood is famous as the host of a well-known public school that takes its name from the town. In the English educational system, “public school” actually means “private school.” The Brentwood School opened its doors in 1558, after being granted a license by Queen Mary. The historical origin of the town’s name goes back to when it was called ‘Burnt Wood.’ Today’s name is a corruption of those two words.

Brentwood began its life as a small clearing that had been created in the center of a vast forest as a result of a fire that created the clearing, hence the reason for why it was once referred to a Burnt Wood. It seems that it attracted people to settle there because it lay along a central crossroad that connected London and Colchester. The first notable settlement activity was the building of a chapel in the 13th century. It has of course grown steadily since those days.

The ceremonial and non-metropolitan county of Essex lies in the eastern region of England. It has a current population of around 1. 7 million people, ranking it 6th in terms of population. Both Brentwood and Essex are classic examples of the long reach of history which permeates English existence in the British Isles.