Harlow in Essex – A Short History to the Present Day

History: Although the original village was mentioned in the Domesday Book, the new town of Harlow was built after the World War ll to ease the overcrowding in London. The development consisted of the market town of Harlow, known these days as Old Harlow, plus the villages of Great Parndon, Little Parndon, Potter Street, Latton, Tye Green, Churchgate Street and Nettleswell.

Included in the plans was Britain’s first residential tower block, The Lawn, which is today a Grade 2 listed building, and also Britain’s first ever pedestrian precinct.

Recent Developments: The town has undergone a mini expansion in recent times, with a large scale housing project known as Church Langley. In addition the £50M Harlow Gateway Partnership was formed in 2003 to find new land for housing and relocate and upgrade the sporting facilities in the town.

The project included a new Football Stadium, 530 new eco-homes on the old sports centre site, plus a state of the art Leisure Centre, including Swimming Pool and sporting facilities which will be used by competitors from all over the world during the London Olympics in 2012.

The aim of the project was not just to achieve the above, but also build stronger links between education, sport and health, whilst creating new jobs and training opportunities. A council spokesman said it would create a “lasting legacy” for the town of Harlow, and one that the residents would be proud of for years to come.

Recently, the project came runner-up in Local Government Chronicle and Health Service Journal Awards 2009, being highly commended in the ‘Creating a Lasting Legacy’ category.

The Town of Brentwood, Essex

The town of Brentwood, Essex, England lies within the commuter zone of the city of London, about 20 miles to the northeast of the Charing Cross junction lying within the city. Lying near to the M25 motorway, which is a 117 mile long beltway encircling London, Brentwood is also the principal settlement of the Borough of Brentwood.

Known largely as a commuter and suburban town, Brentwood enjoys a small but growing shopping district along its main street. It has a current population of around 45, 000 people within its boundaries, and there is a quite nice expanse of open country and no small amount of woodland that butts up closely in spots, reaching even to the center of town.

Brentwood is famous as the host of a well-known public school that takes its name from the town. In the English educational system, “public school” actually means “private school.” The Brentwood School opened its doors in 1558, after being granted a license by Queen Mary. The historical origin of the town’s name goes back to when it was called ‘Burnt Wood.’ Today’s name is a corruption of those two words.

Brentwood began its life as a small clearing that had been created in the center of a vast forest as a result of a fire that created the clearing, hence the reason for why it was once referred to a Burnt Wood. It seems that it attracted people to settle there because it lay along a central crossroad that connected London and Colchester. The first notable settlement activity was the building of a chapel in the 13th century. It has of course grown steadily since those days.

The ceremonial and non-metropolitan county of Essex lies in the eastern region of England. It has a current population of around 1. 7 million people, ranking it 6th in terms of population. Both Brentwood and Essex are classic examples of the long reach of history which permeates English existence in the British Isles.

What University Has the Highest Enrollment?

In June The Times released The Good University Guide 2009 which ranks the top Universities in the UK on such factors as student satisfaction, research quality, and the ratio between students and staff. Although many elements must be taken into account when deciding which institution to apply for, it occurred to me that one of the most popular questions asked online concerns simply the number of students enrolling at our universities. The following discusses a selection of the listed universities in regards to their Times rankings, as well as the number of students enrolling.

Imperial College London. The highest ranking of the big city colleges, The Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine has held its spot at number three for another year in The Times rankings. Founded just over a hundred years ago, as the college turned a century there were 13,410 students in total with 5,060 studying at postgraduate level. The institution is located in South Kensington and the current acceptance rate of undergraduate admissions is 17.5 per cent.

University of Birmingham. In terms of the second most highly populated city in England, The University of Birmingham currently ranks the highest according to The Times at number 25. In comparison to Imperial the student staff ratio is lower but the intake of students is far greater. In the year 06/07 the total amount of students was 30,415 with 11,935 taking postgraduate studies. As of 2008, the institution has now split into five colleges, each with its own specialism.

University of Essex. So to find the better student to staff ratio should you choose to enroll at a smaller university? The up and coming University of Essex follows this rule with a ratio of 14.1 students per staff member. The Higher Education Statistic Agency published that for 2006 – 2007 there were 11,660 students in total with 3,305 postgraduates enrolled. Although a relatively young university, the institution is also becoming highly regarded in terms of online education.

University of Oxford. The highest ranking according to The Times, the University of Oxford remains at number one for another year. This honour comes from a combination of a good student to staff ratio of 11.6 and a very high satisfaction percentage among students at 84 per cent. From 2006 to 2007 there were 19,070 students in total with over a third being postgraduates. Acceptance of students from state schools in 2006 was 25 per cent.