Days Out in Essex

With some of the most beautiful countryside and coastline in Britain and a large range of attractions offering impressive and relaxing activities for all the family, Days out in Essex are exciting, interesting and entertaining but never dull.

Ramblers visit the region from all over the world as Essex has some of the best long distance and easy rambling routes in the UK. Perfect for taking your binoculars or camera along to view and study nature or simply to enjoy the local surroundings, you can take in the fresh air and relax with your favourite walking company.

The coastline is characterised by many river inlets and marshland, and these lead to some superb walks. The Essex Way, an 81-mile long distance path marked with dark green plaques and helpful arrows starts at Epping and ends at the seaside town of Harwich.

You can walk the route in stages or make a holiday of it, staying in accommodation along the way. Walk through ancient woodlands, open farmland, tree-lined river valleys and visit along the way some enchanting villages and historic places.

There are plenty of Days out in Essex to enjoy on your bike. Whether you regularly cycle and take your bike on holiday, or simply like the idea of spending a leisurely day or two exploring on two wheels, Essex has ample countryside to see and some lovely signed routes such as in the Lee Valley Park and Epping Forest areas which are perfect for all ages and abilities.

Discover routes along quiet lanes through picturesque villages, around reservoirs or off-road cycle tracks. There are several National Cycle Network signed routes in the county, many of which are mapped and can be viewed on this site:

The Essex coast is a great place to take the family on a road trip. Adventure, fabulous scenery and with many historical sites, travelers can come across some truly unique educational experiences, making Days out in Essex perfect for occupying the kids on those long school holidays.

Driving off the mainland, Essex has some small islands that are well worth a visit, such as the ever popular Mersea Island and Osea Island. Both these islands are joined to the mainland by causeways which can become flooded at high tide, so care must be taken when visiting and a watchful eye kept on the local tidal times.

The Town of Brentwood, Essex

The town of Brentwood, Essex, England lies within the commuter zone of the city of London, about 20 miles to the northeast of the Charing Cross junction lying within the city. Lying near to the M25 motorway, which is a 117 mile long beltway encircling London, Brentwood is also the principal settlement of the Borough of Brentwood.

Known largely as a commuter and suburban town, Brentwood enjoys a small but growing shopping district along its main street. It has a current population of around 45, 000 people within its boundaries, and there is a quite nice expanse of open country and no small amount of woodland that butts up closely in spots, reaching even to the center of town.

Brentwood is famous as the host of a well-known public school that takes its name from the town. In the English educational system, “public school” actually means “private school.” The Brentwood School opened its doors in 1558, after being granted a license by Queen Mary. The historical origin of the town’s name goes back to when it was called ‘Burnt Wood.’ Today’s name is a corruption of those two words.

Brentwood began its life as a small clearing that had been created in the center of a vast forest as a result of a fire that created the clearing, hence the reason for why it was once referred to a Burnt Wood. It seems that it attracted people to settle there because it lay along a central crossroad that connected London and Colchester. The first notable settlement activity was the building of a chapel in the 13th century. It has of course grown steadily since those days.

The ceremonial and non-metropolitan county of Essex lies in the eastern region of England. It has a current population of around 1. 7 million people, ranking it 6th in terms of population. Both Brentwood and Essex are classic examples of the long reach of history which permeates English existence in the British Isles.

What University Has the Highest Enrollment?

In June The Times released The Good University Guide 2009 which ranks the top Universities in the UK on such factors as student satisfaction, research quality, and the ratio between students and staff. Although many elements must be taken into account when deciding which institution to apply for, it occurred to me that one of the most popular questions asked online concerns simply the number of students enrolling at our universities. The following discusses a selection of the listed universities in regards to their Times rankings, as well as the number of students enrolling.

Imperial College London. The highest ranking of the big city colleges, The Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine has held its spot at number three for another year in The Times rankings. Founded just over a hundred years ago, as the college turned a century there were 13,410 students in total with 5,060 studying at postgraduate level. The institution is located in South Kensington and the current acceptance rate of undergraduate admissions is 17.5 per cent.

University of Birmingham. In terms of the second most highly populated city in England, The University of Birmingham currently ranks the highest according to The Times at number 25. In comparison to Imperial the student staff ratio is lower but the intake of students is far greater. In the year 06/07 the total amount of students was 30,415 with 11,935 taking postgraduate studies. As of 2008, the institution has now split into five colleges, each with its own specialism.

University of Essex. So to find the better student to staff ratio should you choose to enroll at a smaller university? The up and coming University of Essex follows this rule with a ratio of 14.1 students per staff member. The Higher Education Statistic Agency published that for 2006 – 2007 there were 11,660 students in total with 3,305 postgraduates enrolled. Although a relatively young university, the institution is also becoming highly regarded in terms of online education.

University of Oxford. The highest ranking according to The Times, the University of Oxford remains at number one for another year. This honour comes from a combination of a good student to staff ratio of 11.6 and a very high satisfaction percentage among students at 84 per cent. From 2006 to 2007 there were 19,070 students in total with over a third being postgraduates. Acceptance of students from state schools in 2006 was 25 per cent.